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Safari Wonders

by Keshav Ch on January 21, 2010

Bear Hug

Bear Hug
Safari Wonders
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The Singer

I'm back.. I think.

I took time off to deal with some health issues that were a bit scary for awhile but the results are in and everything is fine. The possibility of having cancer again isn't so scary but the fact that I'm deathly allergic to taxol which is used in chemo in most treatments is a bit unsettling.

I haven't taken a photo since Christmas but will get out this weekend and start snapping again.

I'll be around to check out what you have all been doing as soon as possible.

The singer
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Weird hair Day

Weird Hair Day
Safari Wonders
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Roosevelt Elk

Elk
Safari Wonders
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Funny Face - Llama

Llamas are such adorable critters.

Funny Face - Llama
Safari Wonders
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African Wonder Life

by Keshav Ch on January 21, 2010

It is the perfect trip for all the serious amateur and future professional wildlife photographers that want to rub shoulders with a professional wildlife photographer operating in Africa. If you choose the correct trip, you will also go back home with a decent African wildlife portfolio (although a truly professional portfolio only comes with years of hard work and payience…).

Lion Cubs

Lion Cubs Playing - Cubitje Quap waterhole,
Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa
Copyright © Dries Cronje

So why should you choose African Photographic Safaris over general African Safaris? I try to answer this question below.

African Photographic Safaris are not for everyone, but if you are reading the content of this website, you might be a good candidate for such a specialised safari. I give some of the advantages and disadvantages of photographic safaris below. This should help you make up your mind.

Advantages of African Photographic Safaris

  • Photographic safaris are aimed at wildlife photographers. On such trips special attention is given to wildlife photography.
  • As photography is the name of the game, there will be a strong focus on finding and spending time with the big five.
  • You will be in the field at the right hours for photography. Decent lighting is what makes or breaks wildlife photographs.
  • One of the main aims will be to find animals, so you will spend time with highly trained guides and trackers. This will add to your experience in a number of ways.
  • There are normally opportunities for you to go on a guided bush walk with an armed ranger for up close experiences with Africa’s wildlife. It is not a standard feature of general safaris and, in fact, it is not allowed in most reserves. It makes for some exciting encounters and excellent photographic opportunities.
  • All you will take back home from Africa is your photographs. On a photographic safari, your photographs will be of a much higher standard than those you took on a general safari.



  • Blue Wildebeest

    Blue Wildebeest Chase - Kwang waterhole,
    Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa
    Copyright © Dries Cronje

    Disadvantages of African Photographic Safaris

  • Photographic safaris are more expensive. You will have a professional wildlife photographer, ranger and tracker with you on all excursions. This increases costs.
  • You will be up and in the field before sunrise. You will also most probably go on a guided walk every day. After that you will have a sunset game drive. At night you will be listening to interesting stories around a camp fire and having a couple of drinks. Therefore, you will not be getting too much sleep. General safaris are conducted at a much less tiring pace.
  • Conclusion

    There are both pros and cons to African Photographic Safaris, and I will be the first to admit that such specialised trips are not for everyone.

     

     

    Gibbon Apes - Sharing Breakfast

    Isn't it sweet how this gibbon ape was sharing a breakfast banana with his mate? :)

    NOT! He handed it to her and when she reached for it he pulled it back.. twice! The third time he did it to her, she turned her back on him and wouldn't even look at him.

    these mates have been together on their island as long as I've been going to the Safari. The female had a baby at one time that was fun to watch.

    Sharing
    African Wonder Life
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    Sika Deer

    The male sika deer get pretty scruffy looking at times. This one is looking quite cool with his fancy earring though.

    Sika Deer
    African Wonder Life
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    Teddy Bear

    Just a big ol Teddy Bear

    Teddy Bear

    The love life creatures

    by Keshav Ch on January 21, 2010



    Each is the subject of a winning photograph (categories People, Places, and Nature, respectively) in National Geographic’s International Photography Contest 2009.

    Nature_GrandPrize.jpg

    The spectacular images by Hugo Machado, Debra Jansen, and William Goodwin took top honors amid a field of thousands submitted by photographers worldwide. National Geographic magazine has published weekly highlights on its website since August.

    Standout submissions included images of animals galore, including (among many others) a brown vine snake …

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    … a newborn silver-leaf langur …

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    … a dusty elephant …

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    Amazing Wild World

    by Keshav Ch on January 21, 2010

    One Cubic Foot of Life

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    It’s not quite William Blake’s “world in a grain of sand.” But almost!

    For the February issue of National Geographic magazine, photographer David Liittschwager crafted a one-foot-square metal cube and placed it in a range of ecosystems—land and water, tropical and temperate, freshwater and marine. Over several weeks at each location, Liittschwager and a team of biologists found, identified, and photographed creatures that passed through the cube.

    The result is a microcosmic—and visually stunning—inventory of ecosystem biodiversity at our planet’s surface and just below. "It was like finding little gems," says Liittschwager. (Watch him place his cube in New York's Central Park.)

    “In any habitat,” writes Harvard naturalist E.O. Wilson for the issue, “on the ground, in the forest canopy, or in the water, your eye is first caught by the big animals—birds, mammals, fish, butterflies. But gradually the smaller inhabitants, far more numerous, begin to eclipse them. There are the insect myriads creeping and buzzing among the weeds, the worms and unnameable creatures that squirm or scuttle for cover when you turn garden soil for planting.”

    Here—just beneath the surface, in soils, streambed sediments, and reef rubble—lurk countless species unknown to science.

    Dig and you shall find.

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    Dutch Youth Wins Big With Seaweed Photo

    Funny Animals

    by Keshav Ch on January 21, 2010

    Big rabbit ears!

    Wow! This rabbit really has big ears!

    I find this picture quite funny, but I wonder if it is a real picture. I know some of the readers of that blog are experts regarding animals, so can you tell me if some species of rabbits have ears big like these? Thanks!

    Funny Animals
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    Funny picture

    If you want to know how many snow we have in Québec, look at this funny picture.

    This dog is so funny, it eats the snow!  This picture show us how many snow can fall down after a big winter storm! :-)

    Funny Animals
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    Squirrel gets furious

    Baby Animals - the new world

    by Keshav Ch on January 15, 2010

    More baby zoo animals!

    AWWW baby zoo animals!!  ABC News added more adorable baby zoo animals to their slideshow!  Here are some of the cutest.  Photos and captions originally posted here.

    A Langur infant is seen in the zoo in Hanover, northern Germany, on Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2009, where two Langurs were born during the last three weeks. Langurs predominantly feed leaves and the Hanover zoo freezes leaves in summer to feed to the Langurs during winter time.
    (Joerg Sarbach/AP Photo)

    Amani, shown here, was born Dec. 8 to mother Rachaael and father Mchimbaji, at the Detroit Zoo. Amani means “peace” in Swahili. The 23-inch infant arrived hairless, weighing 3 pounds, 10 ounces, with ears measuring 4 inches. The zoo is awaiting DNA tests to determine the newborn’s sex.

    (Mark M. Gaskill/Detroit Zoo/AP Photo)

    The baby hippopotamus swims beside its mother, “Kati,” at a Berlin zoo. The baby hippo was born Nov. 29, 2008.
    (MICHAEL KAPPELER/AFP/Getty Images)

    Two white lion cubs, an extremely rare subspecies of the African lion, were born on Dec. 9, in the Belgrade Zoo in Serbia, which now has five white lions. White lions are unique to the Timbavati area of South Africa; they are not albinos but a genetic rarity.
    (Srdjan Ilic/AP Photo)

    One-month-old elephant twins play around their mother’s leg at an elephant breeding center in Chitwan Dec. 6, 2008. The pair, born to a 30-year-old elephant, are Nepal’s first jumbo elephant twins. Authorities celebrate the twins as a conservation success, as elephants are protected by law in the Himalayan nation.
    (Gopal Chitrakar / Reuters)

    Meet baby pandas Meihin and Eihin! The 2-month-old Giant Panda twins were born in western Japan in September. Their names were unveiled Thursday.
    (Kyodo News/AP Photo)

    Wonderful world

    by Keshav Ch on January 15, 2010

    kitty yawn!

    *YAWN*

    Fuzzy little kitty is sleepy.  I’m glad I’m not the only one!  Naps time plz

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    kitty in a cherry tree

    All of the cherry tree blossoms are finally starting to disappear.  At least we got to enjoy almost 4 full weeks of their beauty!   It looks like this teeny kitty appreciates the cherry blossoms too :)

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    baby otters born at SeaWorld in Orlando!

    ORLANDO, FLA. - SEAWORLD ORLANDO’S NEWBORN OTTERS IN GOOD HANDS - SeaWorld animal trainers in Orlando have their hands full with four baby Asian small-clawed otters.  Born just three weeks ago to parents Simon and Sophie, the pups are nursing and will open their eyes in about a week.  Asian small-clawed otters live in the rivers, creeks, estuaries and coastal waters of Southeast Asia, from northern India to southeastern China, the Malay Peninsula and parts of Indonesia.  SeaWorld breeds the otters as part of the Association of Zoos and Aquarium’s Species Survival Plan, which aims to preserve, in zoos and aquariums, animals that are threatened or endangered in the wild. To discover more about otters and other sea life, go to SeaWorld.org.

    Photo credit:  Jason Collier/SeaWorld Orlando

    omgosh he’s so tiny and cute!!!  Look at his tiny little feeties!!!

    awww!!!!!!!

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    a couple of fluffy puppies!

    Two cute little fluffy puppies hanging out on a stump!  SO cute!  The one on the right is so chubby cheeked and adorable!

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    hammys pwn at virtua fighter!

    Everyone knows you can never beat

    Cute Animals

    by Keshav Ch on January 15, 2010

    chipmunk nibblin on some nibblins

    This little teeny chipmunk is nibblin’ on some nibblin’s!

    chipmunkeating

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    Hammy and Cheese

    It’s a hammy eating some cheese!  on nom nom

    hamncheese

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    Portable kitten

    portable kitten is portable, even when sleeping!

    handkittennap_thumb

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    St. Bernard Puppies

    This cute photo of St. Bernard puppies was found on a nydailynews slide show of cute animals!

    they look so sleepy!

    stbernardpuppies

    Credits: Coffrini/Getty

    Does it get any cuter than these two-week-old Great St. Bernard puppies? They were born in Martigny, Western Switzerland – where the iconic breed is celebrated for its search and rescue capabilites.

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    fluffy puffy bunny bunny

    New new life of Animals

    by Keshav Ch on January 10, 2010

    Oh Fudd.


    Dash mistakenly thought he was safely perched—but knew there was trouble when his “perch” suddenly began to lift up with a small voice saying, “Be veh-wy, veh-wy quiet…”

    More pics of Dash here! Thanks, Sami C.

    Posted in Uncategorized Tagged: Bunnies New new life of Animals New new life of Animals New new life of Animals New new life of Animals New new life of Animals New new life of Animals
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    Craftmatic Adjustable Hand


    Tony Hamza loved to curl up in his favorite chaise and treat himself to a little snack. But when he pressed the “massage” button and the chaise began

    Love Birds

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010

    A Beautiful Young Mandarin Duck Paddling Lazily In The Green Waters

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    Love Birds

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010

    A Beautiful Young Mandarin Duck Paddling Lazily In The Green Waters

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    Cute Kittens for you..

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010

    Funny Kittens



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    Snow Animas love

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010

    Picture From National Geography

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    Bird in Flight ( Best Photography )

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    The top 10 Famous Monkeys in Science

    It’s a common theory that, given enough time (and food … and ink ribbon), a million monkeys on a million typewriters will eventually bang out the works of Shakespeare. But that only goes for average monkeys. Round up a few higher-class primates armed with an education and some travel experience, and we wouldn’t be surprised if you got a masterpiece on par with Harry Potter or The Firm. In fact, the following 10 hot-shot simians might even know enough to assemble a science textbook; in which case, they’d definitely need to leave room for a chapter about themselves.

    1. KokoSnow Animas love

    Noam Chomsky didn’t get long to bask in the glory of Nim Chimpsky’s failures. In 1972, Stanford graduate student Francine Patterson began teaching American Sign Language to a female lowland gorrila named Koko. In only a few weeks, she was making the correct signs for food and drink.


    Known as the world’s first "speaking" gorilla, Koko currently boasts a vocabulary of more than 1,000 signs and understand roughly 2,000 spoken words. She still struggles with the occasional word, though. Unfortunately, one of them happens to be "people," which she tends to substitute with "nipple," thus explaining how she became the defendant in a sexual harassment case against some caretakers a few months back (seriously).

    When not signing or pushing the envelope of political incorrectness,koko enjoys playing on her computer. In 1998, she even logged onto America Online and fielded questions from the public through an interpreter. During that chat, fans were able to learn what pet Koko would like to have ("dog"), the first-hand gossip on what she thought about the male gorilla brought in to be her mate ("frown bad bad bad"), and what a 310-pound gorilla really wants ("candy, give me"). But such mindless banter clearly wasn’t enough to hold the attention of a genius gorilla. Koko soon grew bored with the chat (calling it "obnoxious") and wandered off to play with her dolls.

    2. KanziSnow Animas love

    So you think you’re special because you taught you simian sign language? Before you go and register the little guy in any big talent shows, be prepared to put your monkey where your mouth is.

    In the 1980s, researchers at Georgia State University began studying the bonobo chimpanzees’ ability to understand and mimic human language. They started out with a bonobo trainee named Matata, but even after several years, they weren’t able to make much headway with her. Matata’s adopted baby son Kanzi, however, was a different story. Turns out, the young chimp picked up quite bit (more than his mommy, certainly) by accompanying Matata to "school" every day. In 2002, researchers began noticing that Kanzi was able to express his needs using four distinct sounds that corresponded to specific objects or commands (banana, juice, grapes, and yes). While this particular brand of beat poetry isn’t necessarily stimulating, the very suggestion that primates employ an audible "language" is a direct affront to the linguistic experts who claim they don’t have the marbles to do so.Besides accomplishing the academic kiss-off "Nim" Chimpsky could only dream about, Kanzi has established himself a true primate prodigy. In addition to "bonobo," he understands between 2,000 and 3,000 spoken words in English. He even communicates with his tutor, psychologist Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, by punching abstract symbols on a special keyboard. While most Americans still can’t bring themselves to learn a

    Pretty Cat

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010

    Cyclops cats, two-headed birds and monster dogs

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    Animal Entertain childeran

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    Wild love

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010

    World’s oldest animals

    Wild loveJonathan the tortorise and Mischief the cat may have hit the headlines for their longevity, but there are plenty of other creatures giving them a run for their money in the age stakes.

    This photo of a tortoise was taken on the island of St. Helena in the South atlantic Ocean. The tortoise, named Jonathan, still lives there today. He may be the world’s oldest living animal.

    A spokesman for the island’s tourist board said Jonathan is owned by the St Helena government and lives in the specially built plantation on the governor’s land.

    He said: “Jonathan is the sole survivor of three tortoises that arrived on St Helena Island in 1882.

    “He was already mature when he arrived and was at least 50-years-old.

    “Therefore his minimum age is 176-years-old. He is the oldest inhabitant on St Helena and is claimed to be the oldest living tortoise in the world.

    Wild loveIcelandic scientists have found a 400-year-old clam, nearly twice as old as any other animal in history.

    The clam — a qahog or, technically, Arctica islandica — spent those centuries in the frigid Atlantic waters off Iceland’s north coast.

    As the press release notes, “When this animal was a juvenile, King James I replaced Qqueen Elizabeth as English monarch, Shakespeare was writing his greatest plays Hamlet, Othello, King Lear and Macbeth and Giordano Bruno was burnt at the stake for espousing the view that the Sun rather than the Earth was the centre of the universe.”

    Wild loveRabbit: Fourteen-year-old George, from Tewksbury, Massachusetts in the US, was recognised as the oldest rabbit in the world by the Guinness Book of World Records earlier this year.

    The average life expectancy of a rabbit is six to eight years, making George an estimated 160 years old in human terms. His owners met at college and fed their pet Doritos.

    Wild loveCat: Spike, a ginger and white tom, died two months after his 31st birthday in July 2001 – making him the world’s oldest cat.

    He was bought for two shillings and sixpence in London’s Brick Lane market in 1970 and nearly died at the age of 19 when he was attacked by a dog.

    Spike’s owners, from Bridport in Devon, used to put aloe vera gel into his cat food.

    Wild loveSpider: The world’s oldest spider is thought to have been a female from the Theraphosidae family, which lived up to the age of 28. The bird-eating arachnid was captured in Mexico
    Wild love
    in 1935.
    Wild loveDog: At 29, black Labrador Bella was thought to be the oldest dog in the UK until her death in September.
    She was bought from an RSPCA sanctuary 26 years ago and lived out her long life in Derbyshire.
    Wild loveGuinea Pig: The average age for a guinea pig may be between five and eight years, but the official record is 14 years and 10 and a half months.
    Wild loveMonkey: Bueno, a black spider monkey, died in 2005 at the age of 53 and was thought to be the world’s eldest monkey.

    She lived a “stress-free” life at the Japan Monkey Centre in Aichi, 150 miles west of Tokyo. The average black spider monkey lives for between 30 and 33 years.

    Wild loveGoldfish: Tish beat all the records by living to a ripe old age of 43 after being won a funfair in Doncaster in 1956.

    As he aged, his scales faded from orange to silver but his owner Hilda Hand said the key to his longevity was not feeding him too much and placing him in the sun every now and then.

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    Beautiful Butterfly

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010

    Beautifull Butterfly

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    Euro Climbs on Growing Optimism

    The euro climbed versus a number of currencies in the start of this week as investors’ confidence rose in the region, providing support for speculations regarding the end of the recession in the countries using the European common currency.
    This week started with pending to the side of risk appetite continuing market trends perceived in the end of last week, when the euro climbed fueled by renewed attractiveness as countries like Germany indicate significant positive economic improvements, suggesting that the recession may end sooner than expected in the Eurozone. Today, the euro is also gaining on speculations that a report regarding factory orders in Germany will show an expansion in July, if confirmed, it will be the fifth consecutive month with positive figures in this sector. Currencies like the yen and the dollar lost the most versus the euro, as traders leave safety attracted by yielding in emergent markets.
    The euro is likely to have a positive week, mainly versus the yen, which could be overpriced after last week’s rally, but it will be difficult for the European common currency to climb very sharply, considering that even if the region is publishing several positive reports, most of the bloc’s members still face recession and complications in different sectors of the economy.
    If you want to comment on the Euro’s recent action or have any questions regarding this currency, please, feel free to reply below.
    Beautiful Butterfly
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    BullFrog And The Unlucky Sparrow

    Beautiful ButterflySpectacular captures of the American Bullfrog preying on an unlucky sparrow. Growing up to a length of 20 centimeters or 7.9 inches, the bullfrog preys on any animal that it can overpower and stuff down its throat. Their stomachs have been found to contain rodents, small turtles, snakes, frogs including bullfrogs and birds of course.

    Ambush predators as they are known for, the bullfrog can be seen submerging large preys (in this case the sparrow) into the water to cut their air supply and defense.

    Beautiful Butterfly
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    Wild and Domestic Love

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010

    Amazing Pro Animal Photography



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    Health Update :-

    High school teams raise breast cancer awareness :-

    Seeing pink throughout October makes sisters Cara and Mary Kate Facchina feel fortunate.

    More than most teenagers, the Mount de Sales tennis players understand the importance of the pink initiatives supported by many high school teams during breast cancer Awareness Month to raise money for the cause and emphasize the need for early detection.

    Had it not been for early detection, their mother, Eileen Facchina, might not be coaching Cara and Mary Kate on the tennis court today.

    Seven years ago, Eileen Facchina was diagnosed with breast cancer. Because her mother had died from the disease and her sister had had it, too, she was vigilant. Her cancer was caught early, when, she said, it was barely there. She had a double mastectomy and has been cancer-free since.

    During October, many local teams participate in national breast cancer awareness initiatives such as the Side-Out Foundation's Dig Pink for volleyball and Longstreth's Play 4 The Cure for field hockey. Some also run the Komen Maryland Race for the Cure.

    Others, including the Facchinas' Mount de Sales team, raise money by selling pink wristbands or pink shoelaces. The Sailors began selling pink shoelaces several years ago, donating the money to Mercy Hospital to help fund transportation for radiation patients.

    Wild and Domestic Love
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    The Talented Roosendaal Rats



    Wild and Domestic LoveRats have been called many things, but… talented? That doesn’t happen very often, but these two rats aren’t ordinary either. Just like the surfing rats, they do cool tricks.

    Trained by Dutch photographer Ellen van Deelen to hold different musical instruments and pose for the camera, the Roosendaal Rats are considered very talented by their owner. She confesses rats weren’t exactly her favorite creatures, but, after buying these two, she realized they are highly intelligent creatures.

    They simply grab the instruments, hold them in a professional manner and aren’t camera shy at all. On the contrary, they listen to their trainer’s commands to the letter, during photo-shoots.

    Now, Ellen aims even higher and wants to teach her furry pets to play the instruments and wants to turn the duo into a larger band.
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    Birds Love

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010

    Beautifull Lovely Bird

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    Cat World

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010

    Cool racoons

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    SNAKES KINGDOME

    by Keshav Ch on January 07, 2010